Archive: Vogue

The gorgeous Carey Mulligan poses as Daisy Buchanan on the May cover of Vogue!

Carey Mulligan, 27,  landed the May issue of Vogue Magazine. On the cover, and inside the magazine, Carey poses as Daisy Buchanan from ‘The Great Gatsby.’ The pictorial is all about Gatsby, which premieres at Cannes, and opens in May. I’m so excited to see the film!!

Carey looks beautiful as Daisy, in the pictures shot by Mario Testino. You can see the full slideshow here!

Read clips from the interview, and see many more pictures after the jump! More »

Beyonce lands the May cover of Vogue UK!

Beyonce covers the May issue of Vogue UK, and today we’re getting our first look at the pictures! I like the cover (enough), but the other two pictures are really rather boring for Vogue, aren’t they?

In the interview, Beyonce opens up about being a feminist, Mrs. Carter and a mother. Here are some clips: More »

SNEAK PEEK: Michelle Obama lands the April cover of Vogue!

Michelle Obama lands the April “Shape Issue” of Vogue Magazine, and today we’re getting our first look at the issue. This is Michelle’s second Vogue cover, and I think she looks amazing. The pictures inside the magazine are beautiful, and taken  by Annie Leibovitz. The interview is long and detailed, if you want to read the full thing here you go. Here are some highlights:

On criticism that the Obama’s don’t entertain enough: “I don’t think it’s our job to put an idea to rest. Our job is, first and foremost, to make sure our family is whole. You know, we have small kids; they’re growing every day. But I think we were both pretty straightforward when we said, ‘Our number-one priority is making sure that our family is whole.’ ”

Barack on his “bachelor pad” when he was in the Senate: “…The culture in Washington has changed in ways that probably haven’t been great for the way this place runs. . . . When you talk to the folks who were in the Senate or the House back in the sixties, seventies, eighties, there was much less pressure to go back and forth to your home state. . . . Campaigns weren’t as expensive. So a lot of members of Congress bought homes here in the area; their kids went to school here; they ended up socializing in part because their families were here. By the time I got to the Senate, that had changed. Michelle and the girls, for example, stayed in Chicago, and I had this little bachelor apartment that Michelle refused to stay in because she thought it was a little, uh. . . .You know, pizza boxes everywhere,” he says. “When she came, I had to get a hotel room.”

The First Lady leans in toward me. “That place caught on fire.”

“It did end up catching on fire,” says the president sheepishly.

“And I was like, I told you it was a dump,” she says. Her husband continues, “As a consequence, I think, when the Washington press writes about this, part of what they’re longing for has less to do with us; it has to do with an atmosphere here where there was more of a community in Washington, which did result, I think, in less polarization. Because if your kids went to school together and you’re seeing each other at ball games and church, then Democrats and Republicans had a sense that this is not just perpetual campaigning and political warfare.”

Barack on Michelle: “Well, what is true is that, first and foremost, Michelle thinks about the girls. And pretty much everything else from Michelle’s perspective right now is secondary. And rightly so. She is a great mom. What is also true is Michelle’s had to accommodate”—he pauses for a long while—“a life that”—another pause—“it’s fair to say was not necessarily what she envisioned for herself. She has to put up with me. And my schedule and my stresses. And she’s done a great job on that. But I think it would be a mistake to think that my wife, when I walk in the door, is, Hey, honey, how was your day? Let me give you a neck rub. It’s not as if Michelle is thinking in terms of, How do I cater to my husband? I think it’s much more, We’re a team, and how do I make sure that this guy is together enough that he’s paying attention to his girls and not forgetting the basketball game that he’s supposed to be going to on Sunday? So she’s basically managing me quite effectively—that’s what it comes down to. I’m sure Valerie might have made it sound more romantic.” The First Lady, who has been staring at her lap through this entire answer, finally looks up and laughs.

What Michelle gets from her husband: “Well, patience and calm I’m borrowing,” says the First Lady. “Or trying to mirror. I’ve learned that from my husband, that sort of, you know, ability to not get too high or too low with changes and bumps in the road . . . to do more breathing in and just going with it. I’m learning that every day. And to the extent that I’ve made changes in my life, it’s just sort of stepping back and seeing a change not as something to guard against but as a wonderful addition . . . that can make life fun and unexpected. Oftentimes, it’s the way we react to change that is the thing that determines the overall experience. So I’ve learned to let go and enjoy it and take it in and not take things too personally.”

What Barack gets from Michelle: “And what Michelle has done is to remind me every day of the virtues of order.” The First Lady lets out a big laugh. “Being on time. Hanging up your clothes. Being intentional about planning time with your kids. In some ways I think . . . we’re very different people, and some of that’s temperamental, some of it is how we grew up. Michelle grew up in a model nuclear family: mom, dad, brother. . . . She just has these deep, wonderful roots. When you go back to Chicago, she’s got family everywhere. . . . There’s just a warmth and a sense of belonging. And you know, that’s not how I grew up. I had this far-flung family, father left at a very young age, a stepfather who ended up passing away as well. My mother was this wonderful spirit, and she was adventurous but not always very well organized. And, so, what that means is that I’m more comfortable with change and adventure and trying new things, but the downside of it is, sometimes—particularly when we were early on in our marriage—I wasn’t always thinking about the fact that my free-spirited ways might be having an impact on the person I’m with. And conversely, early in our marriage, Michelle provided this sense of stability and clarity and certainty about things, but sometimes she resisted trying something new just because it might seem a little scary or push her out of her comfort zone. I think what we’ve learned from each other is that sense of. . . .” “Balance,” she says. “There’s no doubt I’m a better man having spent time with Michelle. I would never say that Michelle’s a better woman, but I will say she’s a little more patient.”

There’s much, much more at the source. It is a veeeeeeeeeeeeery long and detailed interview. What do you think of Michelle’s cover?

Source


Naomi Watts gorgeous Vogue Australia cover!

Naomi Watts looks absolutely gorgeous on the cover of Vogue Australia‘s February 2013 issue.

Here’s some from the interview inside the magazine.

On The Impossible: “It was definitely hard work (but) had it been on green screen, you wouldn’t have got the same feeling. I mean, we were in that pool, struggling to breathe. Of course, nothing to the extent to what the real people went through, but, nonetheless… I’m not even a strong swimmer.”

On playing Princess Diana: “In the case of Diana, of course, there is a huge pressure to look right, to have good hair, to walk and speak (like her). And I instantly thought: ‘Oh no, I’m going to fail at that because the comparisons are going to be monumental’.”

On the acclaim: “Of course it’s nice to hear all that. But one doesn’t want to get too carried away with the buzz. It’s going to either be a happy ending or a disappointment, so if you invest too heavily you are destined to have some sort of anticlimax.”

I went and saw ‘The Impossible’ the other night, and I have mixed feelings on the movie. On one hand – I thought it was amazing. On the other – I felt a bit taken advantage of, emotionally. I’ll explain. The tsunami scene in the beginning of the film is probably one of the hardest scenes I’ve ever watched in a film. It’s so incredibly intense, my stomach was in knots and I found myself not even breathing. It’s spectacular. It is absolutely MIND blowing, that scene.

As for me feeling taken advantage of…. it was the kind of movie that WILL make you cry. And they know it. The emotions are raw, every scene is almost like “are you crying yet? Okay now….. NOW are you crying? That wasn’t sad enough? Okay – how about NOW….. NOW are you crying???” I felt like the movie’s goal was to make you cry. Did I cry? Yes. How could you not. But I don’t like movies like that. Movies that prey on your emotions. I’m not sure how they could have made the movie any different, but I did feel a bit played after the movie was over. I have no idea if this makes any sense to you.

Naomi Watts was nominated for an Oscar for her role in ‘The Impossible’. Did she deserve it? Yeah, I guess so. I don’t think she’ll win – because I think there were better performances last year. But she really did do good.

I would recommend seeing ‘The Impossible’ if nothing else than to see that scene in the beginning (bravo to the director!). But bring your tissues – you’re gonna cry!