Archive: Pregnancy & Parenting

When is the right age to start wearing makeup?

What is the Appropriate Age to Wear Makeup?


From Womens Healthcare Topics

Do you remember dressing up in your mom’s high heels? Putting on her dress? How about wearing her red lipstick and blue eye shadow? We live in a society that influences little girls to grow up fast. For a young lady, wearing makeup is often seen as a rite of passage to becoming a woman. The question is: At what age is it appropriate to wear makeup? What is the appropriate amount of makeup and what colors are best?

There is no “right” age to start wearing makeup. Some girls begin wearing minimal makeup at age 11, such as lipstick or eye shadow. Parents of young girls display controversy on the issue. Some parents are more conservative in their views stating that kids do not get to be kids anymore. More and more young girls are being influenced by music and the media to look, dress and act a certain way. You can find just about any cosmetic product in glitter: nail polishes, lotions, lip gloss, eye makeup, and bikinis are targeting girls ages 6-12.

Some psychologist state that wearing makeup at an early age leads to increased interest from males. Some believe it is sending a message that says you are mature and possibly interested in being in a physical relationship. Makeup changes the perceptions of the face to be similar to that of a mature woman.

You may have heard the famous words, “Everyone’s wearing it in school,” and “It’s not fair.” It is important to question why she truly wants to wear makeup. If it is because everyone else is doing it or so guys will notice her, these are dangerous signals. How you feel about her wearing makeup sets a precedent for everything else she does. Allowing a young girl to wear makeup sooner than when you feel she is ready, may send the message that she can partake in other “adult-like” activities sooner than she is ready for them.

It is an inevitable fact that young girls are going to want to wear makeup at some point in their life. It is essential at the onset of wearing of makeup that clear boundaries are set on what types of makeup and the amount being worn is determined. How much makeup is too much? It is best when staring out, to keep the makeup subtle.

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What age do you think its okay for a girl to start wearing makeup?

Do you think a little makeup is okay or  are we letting little girls grow up to fast?


Come share your thoughts and join the discussion here.

 

Pregnancy Beauty Tips From Hourglass Artistic Director Gina Brooke

Pregnancy is a time of joyous expectation and exciting new changes, but the morning sickness, dehydration and sudden skin sensitivity can sometimes leave you feeling less than beautiful. Gina Brooke, the Artistic Director for Hourglass Cosmetics, is a world-renowned makeup artist and a recent new mother herself, and she’s giving her unique perspective on looking and feeling your best.
“I loved being pregnant, but it certainly inspired some changes in my beauty routine,” says Gina. “Ensuring my body stayed hydrated, protected and free of irritants were my top priorities.”

Now, Gina is sharing her best tips and insider product recommendations for looking and feeling beautiful during your pregnancy:

· Skin is especially fragile during pregnancy, so SPF is key. Gina relies on Hourglass Veil Mineral Primer SPF 15 ($52), a silky, mineral-based primer, before applying makeup. It smoothes the skin, neutralizes redness and hydrates the complexion while being free of gluten, parabens, sulfates and phthalates. It’s also vegan.

· Dry, chapped lips are one of the many side effects that pregnant women experience, and the best way to resolve this is to exfoliate and hydrate on a regular basis. Gina loves Smashbox Emulsion Lip Exfoliant ($18), a sugar-based lip scrub. Poppy seeds and sugar granules gently remove flaky skin, while shea butter conditions your lips. After exfoliating, try Hourglass Aura Sheer Lip Stain ($26). This water-based, liquid gel stain formula offers a delicious wash of color and contains Vitamin E and Green Tea to make lips extra supple.

· Dry hair can be an issue for many moms-to-be as hormone levels fluctuate. Remedy it with Phyto’s Phyto 9 Daily Ultra Nourishing Botanical Cream for Ultra Dry Hair ($26). This leave-in treatment makes hair incredibly silky and shiny with macadamia oil and plant extracts. It also works to smooth frizz and split ends.

· Many women experience dehydrated skin during pregnancy. Gina recommends using Hourglass Illusion Tinted Moisturizer ($55) to restore moisture to the skin and to create the “illusion” of healthy, glowing skin. It has light-reflecting properties and contains hyaluronic spheres which hydrate and keep skin looking soft and hydrated. It also contains an SPF 15 and is free of parabens, gluten, sulfates and phthalates. It’s also vegan.

Discover all of Gina’s recommended products at Sephora stores nationwide and on Sephora.com via computer or smartphone.

European women warned off make-up amid growing fears of harm to unborn

Pregnant women are being warned off beauty products amid fears they could lead to birth defects.
Growing concerns over the effects of chemicals such as parabens, commonly used in cosmetics as a preservative, and phthalates, used in hairspray, have led to calls for a new EU-wide cosmetics labelling system.

The move follows the publication of a study which found that women exposed to high levels of hairspray during pregnancy were twice as likely to have babies born with hypospadias, a condition in which the urinary tract grows on the underside of the penis.
High levels of phthalates, also used to soften plastics such as PVC, have been found to affect hormone levels, while parabens have been the subject of concern since 2004, when a study claimed to have detected parabens from deodorants in cancerous breast tissue.
The French government announced last week that the country’s health authorities were considering a labelling system for cosmetics that would indicate whether or not products were safe for pregnant women.
But the UK government said that the EU should address the issue as a whole, adding it to a range of changes currently being made to the European Cosmetics Directive.
Professor Paul Elliott, who led the Imperial College study into the use of hairspray during pregnancy, backs the introduction of a labelling system.
He told the Independent on Sunday: ‘Labels enable people to make informed choices. In the vulnerable period of pregnancy, it makes sense for people to reduce their exposure to harmful chemicals.

‘It is part of a broader discussion about minimising chemical exposure in early pregnancy.’
Professor Steve Field, chairman of the Royal College of General Practitioners, added:
‘Women who are planning to conceive or who are in the first three months of pregnancy should look at what they are using.

‘The cosmetics industry needs to look at this and clearly label their products. Anything like this raises concerns, but I don’t think people should panic.’

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Would you let your child play with a breast feeding doll?

I was just watching Kathie Lee and Hoda – and they were playing with a controversial new doll that allows girls to mimic breast-feeding.


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A controversial new doll is leaving some parents wishing for the good old Cabbage Patch days.

A Spanish toymaker known as Berjuan has developed a breast-feeding doll that comes with a special halter top its young “mothers” wear as they pretend to breast-feed their “babies.” The halter top has daisies that cover the little girls’ nipples and come undone just as easily as the flaps of a nursing bra would.

The doll — called Bebe Gloton, which translates as “gluttonous baby” — makes sucking noises as it “feeds.”

Like many other dolls, Bebe Gloton can cry, signaling she wants more milk.

Although many health care providers promote the benefits of breast-feeding, parents around the world have criticized Berjuan, saying the idea of breast-feeding is too grown-up for young children — and may even promote early pregnancy.

“That’s not cool,” Lori Reynolds, of El Paso, Texas, told KFOXTV.com. “No, I would never get that for my child.”

But other moms said they support the product.

“I think that it’s great that people want to have a doll that promotes breast-feeding,” said Rose Haluschak, also of El Paso. “Most dolls that are purchased come with a bottle. That is the norm in society, an artificial way to feed your baby.”

Dr. Manny Alvarez, managing health editor of FOXNews.com, said although he supports the idea of breast-feeding, he sees how his own daughter plays with dolls and wonders if Bebe Gloton might speed up maternal urges in the little girls who play it.

“Pregnancy has to entail maturity and understanding,” Alvarez said. “It’s like introducing sex education in first grade instead of seventh or eighth grade. Or, it could inadvertently lead little girls to become traumatized. You never know the effects this could have until she’s older.”

Alvarez said breast-feeding reduces childhood infections, strengthens maternal bonding and increases the child’s immune system. But introducing breast-feeding to girls young enough to play with dolls seems inappropriate, he said.

“What’s next?” wrote Eric Ruhalter, a parenting columnist for New Jersey’s Star Ledger. “Bebe Sot — the doll who has a problem with a different kind of bottle, and loses his family, job and feelings of self-worth? Bebe Limp — the male doll who experiences erectile dysfunction? Bebe Cell Mate — a weak, unimposing doll that experiences all the indignation and humiliation of life in prison?

“Toy themes should be age appropriate. I think so anyway.”

Come Join us in the BLOGFROG COFFEETALK COMMUNITY: What do you think? Would you let your daughter play with this doll?